HELLO FOLLOWERS NEW AND OLD!
Do to one my postings going ape shit and finding out that everybody loves sunfish (molas) I have a ton of new followers so I figured it would be a good time to tell you a little bit about myself.
I am a grad student at CSU Northridge getting my MS in Biology and I am an underwater selfie king.  The school is super awesome, the weather in valley, eh, but i get to spend my summers living on an island studying cool things so its worth it.  I am interested in fisheries research, mostly behavior of aggregating target fishes and big apex things. So with that being said I studying the reproductive behaviors of GIANT SEA BASS. If you don’t know what one looks like, CLICK THIS LINK. They are a beautiful fish, that is part of a now collapsed fishery, which left them endangered. (isn’t she pretty?!?)
I am interested in how they do it and what it takes for them to want to do it aka foreplay or courting. With this I hope to be able to answer some questions about their recovery, such as how long will it actually take for their populations to recover; will they actually recover; how many times does a GSB spawn in a day. Hopefully within the next year I will be able to answer those questions and let you guys know all about it. 

I am also a founding member of the GIANT SEA BASS COLLECTIVE, which is a joint project between CSUN and UCSB dedicated to identifying aggregation sites for GSB to aid in their recovery.
If you have any questions about fish, fish sex, big fish, small fish, fish food or anything you can think of that is fish related I will do my best to answer it.   I will also answer questions about internships, school, grad school, being a marine researcher etc. Here are some questions I’ve answered in the past, maybe you have the same question.
There’s a little bit about me and here is the first GSB gif the internet had ever seen (i believe) made by me, in June.
Cheers!
-thatfishkid

HELLO FOLLOWERS NEW AND OLD!

Do to one my postings going ape shit and finding out that everybody loves sunfish (molas) I have a ton of new followers so I figured it would be a good time to tell you a little bit about myself.

I am a grad student at CSU Northridge getting my MS in Biology and I am an underwater selfie king.  The school is super awesome, the weather in valley, eh, but i get to spend my summers living on an island studying cool things so its worth it.  I am interested in fisheries research, mostly behavior of aggregating target fishes and big apex things. So with that being said I studying the reproductive behaviors of GIANT SEA BASS. If you don’t know what one looks like, CLICK THIS LINK. They are a beautiful fish, that is part of a now collapsed fishery, which left them endangered. (isn’t she pretty?!?)

I am interested in how they do it and what it takes for them to want to do it aka foreplay or courting. With this I hope to be able to answer some questions about their recovery, such as how long will it actually take for their populations to recover; will they actually recover; how many times does a GSB spawn in a day. Hopefully within the next year I will be able to answer those questions and let you guys know all about it. 

I am also a founding member of the GIANT SEA BASS COLLECTIVE, which is a joint project between CSUN and UCSB dedicated to identifying aggregation sites for GSB to aid in their recovery.

If you have any questions about fish, fish sex, big fish, small fish, fish food or anything you can think of that is fish related I will do my best to answer it.   I will also answer questions about internships, school, grad school, being a marine researcher etc. Here are some questions I’ve answered in the past, maybe you have the same question.

There’s a little bit about me and here is the first GSB gif the internet had ever seen (i believe) made by me, in June.

Cheers!

-thatfishkid

strictlysciencedaily
americanwizarding:

Piscae Patronae is considered by many scientists to be the happiest animal on the face of the planet. Known more commonly as the spark fish or a “sparky,” to witches and wizards who live along the shores of the Great Lakes, Piscae Patronae never grows larger than two inches long. Despite its diminutive size it is one of the most potently magical creatures known to wizarding kind.
Found in the deepest, darkest waters of lakes Superior, Huron, and Michigan, Sparkies have evolved the unique ability to replicate a Patronus Charm. The spell takes the form of an individual krill, which lights the darkness of the fish’s habitat like a streak of silver lightning.
On certain nights of the year, Piscae Patronae swarm to the surface in large numbers in certain parts of the lake, illuminating the surface with their magic. It is a spectacular show for anyone lucky enough to witness it, and one which the Department of Secrecy and Obfuscation, along with the Department of Resources and Magical Conservation, keep hidden from the mundane population
Despite their intense beauty, the existence of the Sparkies raises several questions, not the least of which is what a fish’s happiest memory must be, and what lurks in the dark places of the Great Lakes to necessitate such a marvelous but potent adaptation.

americanwizarding:

Piscae Patronae is considered by many scientists to be the happiest animal on the face of the planet. Known more commonly as the spark fish or a “sparky,” to witches and wizards who live along the shores of the Great Lakes, Piscae Patronae never grows larger than two inches long. Despite its diminutive size it is one of the most potently magical creatures known to wizarding kind.

Found in the deepest, darkest waters of lakes Superior, Huron, and Michigan, Sparkies have evolved the unique ability to replicate a Patronus Charm. The spell takes the form of an individual krill, which lights the darkness of the fish’s habitat like a streak of silver lightning.

On certain nights of the year, Piscae Patronae swarm to the surface in large numbers in certain parts of the lake, illuminating the surface with their magic. It is a spectacular show for anyone lucky enough to witness it, and one which the Department of Secrecy and Obfuscation, along with the Department of Resources and Magical Conservation, keep hidden from the mundane population

Despite their intense beauty, the existence of the Sparkies raises several questions, not the least of which is what a fish’s happiest memory must be, and what lurks in the dark places of the Great Lakes to necessitate such a marvelous but potent adaptation.

My buddy Brenton is a Phd student at UCLA and is crowdfunding to pay for his research on  endangered species in California’s coastal wetlands including the endangered Tidewater goby(pictured above). CHECK IT OUT!
Here is a little background on the subject:
California’s coastal wetland habitats are one of the most threatened coastal habitats on the planet, losing over 90% of their habitats in some regions due to rapid population growth and development in the past 150 years. Many of California’s most threatened and endangered species utilize these habitats at some point in their life history. Some of these species include the endangered tidewater goby, red-legged frog, southern steelhead, snowy plover, and the California least tern. 

The purpose of this Kickstarter campaign is to help fund my 4-month photographic journey along the California coast. If successfully funded, this project would allow me to capture images of some of California’s most threatened and endangered ecosystems and wildlife. These images, along with the research I have conducted in these habitats over the past 4 years, will allow me to tell a very detailed story of these critically impacted ecosystems and wildlife to a broad audience. My goal is to link photography and scientific documentation, creating a powerful tool that can promote conservation and sustainability in multiple ways. These include gallery exhibitions that promote public awareness of wetland conservation through imagery, and curriculum and interactive activities that can be used for educational courses and public programs. 
CHECK IT OUT!

My buddy Brenton is a Phd student at UCLA and is crowdfunding to pay for his research on  endangered species in California’s coastal wetlands including the endangered Tidewater goby(pictured above). CHECK IT OUT!

Here is a little background on the subject:

California’s coastal wetland habitats are one of the most threatened coastal habitats on the planet, losing over 90% of their habitats in some regions due to rapid population growth and development in the past 150 years. Many of California’s most threatened and endangered species utilize these habitats at some point in their life history. Some of these species include the endangered tidewater goby, red-legged frog, southern steelhead, snowy plover, and the California least tern. 

The purpose of this Kickstarter campaign is to help fund my 4-month photographic journey along the California coast. If successfully funded, this project would allow me to capture images of some of California’s most threatened and endangered ecosystems and wildlife. These images, along with the research I have conducted in these habitats over the past 4 years, will allow me to tell a very detailed story of these critically impacted ecosystems and wildlife to a broad audience. My goal is to link photography and scientific documentation, creating a powerful tool that can promote conservation and sustainability in multiple ways. These include gallery exhibitions that promote public awareness of wetland conservation through imagery, and curriculum and interactive activities that can be used for educational courses and public programs. 

CHECK IT OUT!

kiloueka
kiloueka:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

thatfishkid:

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 
This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

That is a gorgeous fish.

DOOD I JUST FOUND ONE OF THESE TODAY! And my friend knows the person who took the pic (I think, I might be reading her text wrong)


That’s awesome! Is it different than the one that Juan found or is it the same one!? I’m assuming you’re up in Two harbors as well?

kiloueka:

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

thatfishkid:

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 

This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

That is a gorgeous fish.

DOOD I JUST FOUND ONE OF THESE TODAY! And my friend knows the person who took the pic (I think, I might be reading her text wrong)

That’s awesome! Is it different than the one that Juan found or is it the same one!? I’m assuming you’re up in Two harbors as well?

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. My buddy juan took this shot. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 
This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

A slender mola washed up at the research station that I worked at this summer. My buddy juan took this shot. These fish are gorgeous and are a pelagic fish that rarely come up into our temperate waters. This is another sure sign of an El Niño year here in California

They grow to about a meter which is nothing compared to some of the other members of the molidae family. 

This big guy is a Mola mola, also known as an ocean sunfish and they grow to weights over 1000kg! 

trynottodrown

trynottodrown:

Victory for Australia’s Sharks!

EPA Shuts Down Shark Cull Program; Agrees Shark Cull is Environmentally Unacceptable

Drum lines will not be deployed off Western Australia (WA) beaches this summer after the state’s Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) advised against extending the government’s controversial catch-and-kill shark policy.

The regulator’s chairman, Paul Vogel said the available information and evidence do not provide the organization with a high level of confidence.

Premier Colin Barnett said the recommendation meant that drum lines would not be in place off the WA coast this summer.

Sea Shepherd Australia’s WA Shark Campaigner, Natalie Banks stated, “This is a tremendous victory for the people that understand the vital and important role sharks play in the health of our oceans. Finally their voices have been heard all over the globe.”

The WA shark cull caught a total of 172 sharks over the three-month trial, with the majority of these being tiger sharks. 50 tiger sharks of breeding size (mostly female) were shot and dumped out to sea. Tiger sharks only reproduce every few years and only a small number of their pups survive to maturity. The majority of the so-called “alive-released” sharks were in such a poor state that their chances of survival were slim to none. The WA Government had applied for a three-year extension of the cull.

Sea Shepherd Australia is now urging the Honorable Greg Hunt, Federal Environment Minister, to listen to the public and to listen to the science and put forth shark mitigation strategies that protect human safety without killing marine life. source

guys this is such amazing news! it’s terrible that so many innocent and ecologically important lives were lost in the very barbaric and pointless cull but the fact that it won’t continue at this point, is beyond amazing.