buggirl

buggirl:

It’s HERE!!     LAUNCH DAY!!!!    I’m so excited to share my research goals with you!!

Now more than ever, with programs such as citizen scientists and Project Noah, is the general public becoming more crucial to the scientific process. 

If you could share this post ,and spare a donation to my scientific research, even if it is just $1-$5, you can make a huge difference in conservation and the future of science.

Give a dollar to spiders!!!    Thank you, Tumblr, for continued support and a place for me to share my passions with others.

-Andrea

aka buggirl

my friend is crowdfunding for her research! Help her out and learn a little something about spiders

azlyn5 asked:

How do you use lasers to measure fish? I really wanna know how that works. Im curious.

It’s actually much simpler than it seems. We have two lasers that have been calibrated to 4 inches apart and this is true to about 40ft away.  We shoot the fish with the laser at a 90 degree angle and this is coupled with video. So when we go back to analyze the videos we can take screen caps of when the lasers are hitting the fish perfectly and using a measuring software take accurate measurements of the fish image

On this fish you can see the 2 dots from the laser. With them being 4 inches apart this giant measured to about 9ft in length making it the largest one ever sized

@azlyn5

Anonymous asked:

What would you recommend a person study if they are looking into getting unt marine biology? Is it better to just start out with biology or go straight into a more specific form? I understand that attending grad school is more or less a must in order to obtain a job.

The best thing you can do is get lab experience, and internships. You could have a degree in biology, microbio, biochem, math, physics, chem, etc. and have an equal chance at getting into a grad school if you have had a good internship/ lab to work in.

With any science major you are able to take marine classes, but it does help to have skills outside of marine biology (e.g. math, computer science, stats) because those skills will set you apart from others who are trying to get into that same program.

Many marine ecologists use a lot of modelling so knowing how to read and write code and knowing bio stats makes you stand out against the rest.

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any advice for a high school student who is aspiring to be a marine biologist?

Just have fun with it. Working in marine systems is requires long hours and a lot of patience, both in the field and in the lab. One of my mentors said to me “Science never sleeps, so neither should you.” and it’s totally true. You don’t get to rest until you’re done. Because of this, it is very easy to get wrapped up in all the work and start to hate what you are doing, but if you can just step back and find some time for fun you will be set.

Here are a couple tips that I think you should consider

  1. Unless you are really lucky you will have to go to grad school to get any sort of job
  2. Join a lab at your university as soon as you can. The ones that allow you to do both fieldwork and lab work will get you best geared up for grad school and a potential career.
  3. take Biometry as soon as you can (biological statistics). It is a class that will benefit you throughout your career and the better you are at it, the more doors it can open (in and out of the field).
  4. Get an REU (research experience for undergrads) internship! They pay really well and you get to go to some really cool places. If you can’t get an REU, get some other sort of internship. Experience is key.

Goodluck on your endeavor, it’s an amazingly rewarding field to work in. If you do it right, you will get to visit some really awesome places around the world.

"If science were easy, everybody would be doing it" -Pete Edmunds

thesmileoctopus
thesmileoctopus:

howtoskinatiger:

Don’t Cry For Me, Arthropoda: Studies Find Signs of Emotion in Spiders
Individual spiders have character and personality, according to a paper published by theProceedings of the Royal Society B. The paper, titled Individual personalities shape task differentiation in a social spider, gives details of a study into role allocation in spider societies.It was previously assumed that individuals in social spider communities contributed homogenously, with all tasks, such as prey capture and colony defence, being performed equally by members.The study focused on Stegodyphus sarasinorum, a permanently social spider occurring in India and some surrounding countries. Led by Lena Grinsted of Aarhus University in Denmark, over 600 spiders were marked and observed, with tests singling out boldness and aggression. Variances in response showed that individuals were suited to particular roles. 
Individuals in the test group were highly related and of approximately the same age: the only variable was apparently their personality. The study suggests that task allocation is the result of character traits in individual spiders; personality does not appear to be shaped by random selection of task perfomance, therefore.Character and personality are often attributed only to humans, higher order mammals, and birds. Now it appears that arthropods also have responses that could be considered emotional.
(Source)
Photo: Stegodyphus sarasinorum spiders, marked for identification


NEEDED THIS FOR MY THESIS THANKS FRIEND

thesmileoctopus:

howtoskinatiger:

Don’t Cry For Me, Arthropoda: Studies Find Signs of Emotion in Spiders

Individual spiders have character and personality, according to a paper published by theProceedings of the Royal Society B. The paper, titled Individual personalities shape task differentiation in a social spider, gives details of a study into role allocation in spider societies.

It was previously assumed that individuals in social spider communities contributed homogenously, with all tasks, such as prey capture and colony defence, being performed equally by members.

The study focused on Stegodyphus sarasinorum, a permanently social spider occurring in India and some surrounding countries. Led by Lena Grinsted of Aarhus University in Denmark, over 600 spiders were marked and observed, with tests singling out boldness and aggression. Variances in response showed that individuals were suited to particular roles. 

Individuals in the test group were highly related and of approximately the same age: the only variable was apparently their personality. The study suggests that task allocation is the result of character traits in individual spiders; personality does not appear to be shaped by random selection of task perfomance, therefore.

Character and personality are often attributed only to humans, higher order mammals, and birds. Now it appears that arthropods also have responses that could be considered emotional.

(Source)

Photo: Stegodyphus sarasinorum spiders, marked for identification

NEEDED THIS FOR MY THESIS

THANKS FRIEND